Marlbank Inn | Classy Sunday Roast & BBQ Menu | Award-Winning Legacy

Now the Marlbank Inn is a true representation of what a classic British pub should be. It is in fact; a public house in every sense of the word. Of course, we have some European influences, yes we have a mixed bag of spices and herbs and dishes that are a little Middle Eastern and of course; a thorough breed, ‘the gastronomic bible’ on North Indian preparations.

Marlbank Restaurant & Restaurant Menu Preparations

Indian Street Food – Delhi to Britain. Where did this start and how did Britain fall in love with curry. Curry is such a derogatory word in my vocabulary. Honestly, it almost downplays the significance of it. The English dictionary backups what I’m trying to convey here-

curry1
ˈkʌri/
noun

 1. a dish of meat, vegetables, etc., cooked in an Indian-style sauce of strong spices. “we went out for a curry”

Now my friends and food lovers, Indian food enthusiasts-‘curry’  first-timers, this is not just a love affair that began with an explosion of exquisite Indian food. Brits have always learned for a good curry and there’s certainly an enchanting mysticism that the East and India holds. ‘The Jewel in the Crown’, the spiced tea and spices and Silk Route trades. Which ultimately tie us all together.

A typical Indian restaurant that was perhaps thriving, now filled with diners that took in the experience in its entirety; quite enchanting really… With the pink paper napkins, the bottles of wines in baskets, Chianti or whatever it was, and the waiter ordering everything for us whilst we bask in popodums and some generic Chunteny paste with a Keith Richards singalong.  A food lover generation; or shall I say a more cultured, food-savvy (very general consensus here) audience are seeking authenticity in every sense nowadays.

If we’re eating Red Thai curry, the last thing we want to see in the Kitchen is plastic containers of ‘Red Thai’ paste. I mean the is an argument here I think because the sheer thought of me; of course being Indian food enthusiasts and a pretty adapt Thai and Cantonese chef… Would literally fry of some lemongrass, with groundnut oil, add more ginger and garlic or galanga to be correct; then add the paste sear off the marinated chicken or lamb- finish with coconut cream and hey presto- I have a Thai curry almost as good as the restaurant.

Others would argue; that you must buy all the ingredients, mash all the bits together- with tamarind paste, fish oil, thai sugar cane, the right kinds of vinegar etc. Then you have a true Thai paste.  A familiar site in Indian or Bangladeshi takeaway would be a plastic caters pack of Pataks. I’m not gonna say anymore, but I truly feel that it should refer back to the hot topic on authenticity. You try feeding someone in India a paste and I guess they’d have a few comments. It’s not rocket science isn’t it. Its not real. You pay out to eat the very best. We deserve it right?!

Grown in Malvern and a Homecooked Menu

Whether its a Thai restaurant or an Italian restaurant. Italian restaurant, I don’t want a water downed version; something sent in from the Central kitchen- microwave ding, ding Italian. If you are proud enough to open the doors, be sure its homemade pasta. If you lazy, then just open up with three types on your menu. That’s what I mean here. Its about the little things done right, and our Chef Lewis at the Marlbank and I, will often ponder and recite menus and generally look at what is local, whats in season, what we can do to make it the very best. Sometimes, it takes a lot less than you think. But it starts in the mind; fuelled with consistency and passion.

Balti houses and traditional English pubs are sadly all crawling away from our streets in Britain. The movers and shakers are challenging the norm, with Gastropub fever.  Generally, they have been more equipped with marketing and providing the upscale touches you’d expect along with commanding prices.  Generally, the whole infrastructure from decor, lighting, bar, staff, and presentation of the food need to be ‘bedazzling’.

We have our very own garden and grow Rhubarb, Sage, Bay leafs, Rosemary and Sage. We are currently cultivating many more vegetable such as tomatoes which we often add to our salad, with fine Maldon Salts.

We’re a pub in Malvern and we have a great site in the lovely area of Welland. We’re rustic, cook from the heart and we don’t claim to be a gastropub. We love our food and we feel it is the very best. We’d love for you to come and sample our menu!

Malvern Food Project | A Country Pub & Resturant 

Every week, our daily board hold some kind of BBQ, Clay and Oak smoked flavours. These are for most of our meat dishes, such as Beef Ribeye Steak, Beef Fillet, Beef Tomahawk Steak, Wagyu Beef Steaks,  Slow Roasted Lamb rump, Quails, Whole Chicken, Chicken Wings and other menu items. Lots of these items are first scored over the kiln charcoal, clay firing or oak smoked processes. Once we lock in the flavour by sealing we tend to continue the process with fermentation that dates back to classically French and eastern techniques and processes. Combining this is a balancing act and we’ve thought it out, that why we’re proud to serve it on our menu. Its a labour intensive labour of love and we do it, show we can shine from the competition. We’re mad for it.